Rarest of Rare Things Found in a Film

I was reading an article in Filmmaker Magazine recently and came across this quote, from Nick Daschul. I’m not sure who he is or what he does, but this struck a nerve… at least with me.

“I’ve been reminded of why movies were so important to me back when I was a teenager. It wasn’t the cool camera move, or the heartbeat crush sugar rush romance moment, or the suave magnetic matinee idol glances, or the dolly, or the pop track, or the cigarette flame, or the eyeliner. I guess really what I was looking for, all alone in the dark, far from home, was that rarest of rare things — a friend.”

 

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Maine Comic Arts Festival

I just got home from Portland, Maine… home of the Maine Comic Arts Festival (MeCAF). The day long art/comic show is run by Rick Lowell over at Casablanca Comics and I have to tell you, it is an awesome show.  I missed the opening night reception for my godson’s Christening… but seeing as how I really liked Portland I’m sure it was a great time.

It was held at the Portland Company Complex, which is right on the water and had the feel of an old shipyard building. It was the perfect size (or so it seemed) for the event. I’m a little leery about local shows because they are generally geared towards kids, and this was no exception. If you are familiar with my books, at least until Bulderlyns comes out, then you know why I’m leery. However, within the first ten minutes I had a great talk with an aspiring artist and he just opened the floodgates. It didn’t stop until about a half hour or so before the show closed. Everyone of the guests was really nice, obviously loved comics or art and was great to talk to.

It’s hard for me to leave my table, especially when I’m by myself, so pictures of the event itself are at a minimum. And I don’t get to speak to as many creators as I’d like – usually just my neighbors. I did have a few good talks with other creators who didn’t have tables at the show, but were there supporting.

I went down the street to what I guess is downtown Portland for dinner with a mission – lobster. I chose a place on the water that wasn’t too fancy, because in my experience these places always have better food. It was my first lobster roll and it was awesome. Can’t wait to head back…

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C2E2

After an epic road trip, Zsombor and I finally made it to Chicago for C2E2. We stayed right on the lake, at Michigan and Harrison, so we had the pleasure of seeing a bit of Chicago at night. And, other than the let down of deep dish pizza, I have to say that I was very impressed with the entire show and the city. Because of the space of the hall, I think I would have to give it the nod over NYCC as my favorite con. The people are great at both, interested and knowledgeable about comics (not just pop culture – which is what a lot of these cons have become). NYCC will always take a hit because the main hall is divided in two and artist alley is in a completely separate corridor. C2E2 doesn’t have this problem, at all.  The layout is almost perfect. And Zsombor and I got a great table in Artist Alley… across from Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmioti (great and talented people), the SpeciMen guys (awesome guys) and the folks at Yeti Press (another good group of dudes) – all of whom actually do comics, not nonsensical pop culture art.

We even got to meet a bunch of Kickstarter backers for R.E.M. as well as more than a handful of new faces.  It was a fun show and I can’t wait to go back.

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Zsombor with BumbleBee

Zsombor with BumbleBee

Ryan with Jigsaw

Ryan with Jigsaw

with Decapitated Dan, the most prolific comics journalist out there.

with Decapitated Dan, the most prolific comics journalist out there.

Utah - make it two.

Utah – make it two.

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Zsombor with the lamest quote ever

Zsombor with the lamest quote ever

 

 

AwesomeCon – Photos

After a few months on the road, to Los Angeles to produce a film, then to AwesomeCon in D.C., C2E2 in Chicago and a bachelor party in Vegas – I am finally back on my home turf of New York.  Since I was actually working most of the time, I don’t have a tremendous amount of photos from the conventions… but I do have some.

Below are a few from AwesomeCon, which was held in Washington, D.C.  It was fun, but ultimately this convention was more of a pop culture thing than a comics convention. And we didn’t have the best table – stuck right next to a guy selling grumpy cat artwork. If you weren’t familiar with the type of books I create, they couldn’t be further from pop culture humor and anyone that would walk past a grumpy cat booth and cackle.

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This guy had a simple, but great costume.

This guy had a simple, but great costume.

The saddest con pic ever taken?

The saddest con pic ever taken?

Awesome Con: Washington, DC

If you’re in the Washington, DC area this weekend, swing by Awesome Con and say hello to myself and Zsombor Huszka.  We’ll be in Artist Alley at Table M8 all weekend.  We’ll have copies of R.E.M., Harbor Moon, promo issues of Chasing Rabbits, art prints and t-shirts.  Treat yourself to some good times!

Awesome Con takes place April 18 – 20, 2014 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Friday: 3pm – 8pm
Saturday: 10am – 7pm
Sunday: 10am – 5pm
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Are Comics a Dead-End?

I ask this question somewhat facetiously… because I obviously work in comics (and have two books in production).  Everyone wants to lament how the business is dying and complain about how hard it is to make money. The latter may be all too true, but the statistics don’t actually back the former up.

In fact, 2012 was the best comics sales year of the millenium.

  • Overall, sales of digital comics are growing nicely.  Digital sales tripled last year, to $70 million.
  • The print side saw sales gains of 15%, to $750 million.

One of the reasons comics are doing well is because of digital distribution. In the world of ebooks, there are only a few players in the game: Amazon, Apple, and (barely) Barnes & Noble. The diverse range of comics distributors — both third-party organizations and publishers themselves — mean that users can pick and choose where they shop without sacrificing title availability. This fragmentation also allows for comics companies to pick and choose the way their comics are sold.

Comixology is leading the charge for digital comic distributors. The digital comics distributor was the third-highest grossing iPad app of 2012 and is closing in on 200 million downloads.

Exciting things are happening in digital comics and users get markedly different experiences between print and their devices — creating a separate realm for digital comics that doesn’t cannibalize print. So don’t give up the fight.

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Bulderlyns Finishes Inks

My young adult adventure graphic novel Bulderlyns just recently finished inks, done by Pawel Sambor.  It’s clocking in at 179 pages – so that’s a lot of the black stuff.

6.5 lbs worth of paper.

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Title III of the JOBS Act

If you haven’t been paying attention, the JOBS Act could pave the way for low-budget films to raise money from normal folks in small increments – like the way our graphic novel R.E.M. raised money for printing through Kickstarter.

But the SEC will make sure this is not the wild west.  Right now, they are weighing the language and here are some key points to consider:

  • Maximum aggregate raise is $1 million over a 12-month period.
  • Investors whose annual income and net worth are less than $100,000 can only invest up to $2,000 or 5 percent of their annual income or net worth, whichever is greater,
  • Investors whose annual income or net worth is equal to or more than $100,000 can invest up to 10 percent of their annual income or net worth, whichever is greater.
  • Crowd-funding will only be permitted through an SEC registered intermediary, either a broker dealer or a “funding portal” overseen by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). Because up to 100 brokers and portals could initially seek to enter the space after the rule is adopted, it is likely the SEC will take its time and that the first non-accredited investments wouldn’t begin until the second half of 2014. At the earliest.
The JOBS Act has nothing to do with this guy.

The JOBS Act has nothing to do with this guy.

First Official ‘R.E.M.’ Review

We have had some pretty amazing reader comments and posts about the book, but yesterday saw the first ‘official’ review of the graphic novel.  It comes from Alternative Magazine Online, a UK publication run by Marty Mulrooney.

I’m proud to say it is a glowing one – and can only hope and pray this is the first of many.  The full review is at the site, but here is a quick snippet:

“R.E.M. is a success both as a Kickstarter campaign, and also as a graphic novel that demonstrates genuine and heartfelt passion from its creators. I’ve kept my eye on Ryan Colucci ever since I reviewed Harbor Moon in 2010. As much as I enjoyed that previous work, R.E.M. is a cut above in every department. I must confess that I felt quite a personal connection with Michael’s struggle. My girlfriend suffers from chronic fatigue syndrome and the power of sleep – and the importance of a good night’s sleep actually doing what it’s supposed to, something many people simply take for granted – wasn’t lost on me in the slightest. R.E.M. is a graphic novel that will reward repeat readings, singling out Ryan Colucci and Zsombor Huska as a creative partnership to follow closely. I’m proud to have backed their latest project and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next.”

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Tips on Kickstarter Campaigns

Entreprenuer.com featured a piece of advice I gave during an interview on crowd funding in their article ’10 Tips I Wish I Knew Before I Launched My Kickstarter Campaign’.

I actually told them that I didn’t have just one tip, there was a lot that went into it.  But the thing I try to bring to everything I do is a personal touch.  Going the extra mile and making sure everyone knows that I appreciate their support, no matter how big or small, is important.